Chow Chow Vs Tibetan Mastiff: Breed Comparison

Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff

The ancient Chow Chow and the Tibetan Mastiff have been a part of human history for centuries. For many, these two majestic breeds evoke feelings of awe and admiration. But how do they compare? Are they similar or different? In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the Chow Chow and the Tibetan Mastiff to see what makes them unique.

From the origins of both breeds in ancient China and Tibet to the more modern-day popularity of the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff, you’ll gain an insight into how these majestic animals evolved and why they’re so beloved today.

Through this blog post, you’ll learn about their distinctive looks, demeanours and temperaments – allowing you to decide which breed would be best suited for your lifestyle and living situation. So prepare yourself for a journey into a world populated by two iconic breeds!

CategoryChow ChowTibetan Mastiff
Life Span13 to 14 years13 to 14 years
ColoursBlack, Blue, Fawn, Cream, and RedBlack, Black & Tan, Brown & Tan, Brown, Red Gold, and Blue Gray
BathRegularRare
DroolingYesYes
EffortsAttention Towards TrainingRegular Brushing & Regular Exercise
Food ExpenditureHighVery High
Visits to GroomerHighHigh
Coat Typerough and smoothFlat and dense
BiteSlightly undershotScissor
Guide DogNoNo
Under CoatYesYes
Prone to ObesityNoYes
Veterinarian VisitsRareRare
Affinity to waterLowLow
Guide DogNoNo
Complication in BreedingNoNo
Litter Size4 to 6 puppies (approximately)6 to 9 puppies (approximately)
Ear Typetriangular in shape and erectFolded
Eyes Shape/TypeAlmondMedium
Tail TypeOver the back hanging on sideCurled
Wrinkles & FoldsNoNo
BiteSlightly undershotScissor
Adaptable to small apartments3/53/5
Kid Friendly3/53/5
Dog Friendly2/53/5
Stranger Friendly2/51/5
Prey Drive3/53/5
Easy to train3/53/5
Exercise needs4/55/5
Easy to Groom3/53/5
General Health4/54/5
Good for novice owners3/53/5
Tolerates being alone3/52/5
Barking Level1/53/5
Drooling Level3/53/5

Key Differences in Detail Between Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff

Origin And History

The Chow Chow Dog is a timeless canine companion that has been the delight of families for centuries. Originating in Mongolia and Northern China, these furry four-legged friends made their way to Europe in the 18th century, where they quickly became popular pets. Throughout their lengthy history, the Chow’s ability to bond with people has earned them many admirers. 

Chow Chow Dog Roaming in a Forest

The name “Chow Chow” comes from a Cantonese word meaning “puffy-lion dog”, which accurately describes their lion-like manes! These furry bundles of joy are known for their teddy bear faces and blue tongues.

Bred as guard dogs, hunting companions and sledge pullers by nomadic tribes of Eastern Asia over two thousand years ago, Chow Chows have been beloved family members ever since. 

Tibetan Mastiff Dogs have a long and interesting history shrouded in mystery. This majestic breed is believed to have originated in the Himalayan mountain range as early as 1100 BC. 

Big Tibetan Mastiff with thick dark fur looking at camera while lounging on pink blanket on stones under multi colored pieces of cloth on sticks in mountain valley

Native to the region, these dogs were bred and used by Tibetan monks for protection from predators and poachers. The breed was also regarded highly for their courage and intelligence, which made them ideal guard dogs for monasteries and herding livestock. 

The Tibetan Mastiff Dog is said to be one of the oldest breeds of domesticated canines, earning its title as “the original guardian of Tibet.”

Temperament: “Which breed is more effective at managing their behavioural reactions?”

The Chow Chow is known for its loyal, independent nature and dignified attitude. They are notoriously aloof with strangers but will remain devoted to their families once they feel comfortable within their home environment.

Chow Chows might look docile, but they tend to be aggressive if provoked or not socialized properly during puppyhood. Their tolerance level is very low when it comes to roughhousing from young children. They need a lot of patience and care to ensure that they won’t lash out to protect themselves. 

On the other hand, the Tibetan Mastiff has a calm disposition but can be territorial if not properly trained from puppyhood. This breed is highly intelligent, so owners need to provide constant mental stimulation for them to remain content and healthy. They have a protective streak but should always be supervised around young children due to their size and strength.

Appearance and Coat

The Chow Chow is a majestic and ancient breed of dog, originating from China over 2,000 years ago. The Chow has a distinct and striking appearance with a luxurious lion-like coat. Typically they are well-built, squarely proportioned animals with sturdy frames. Their eyes are deep-set and slanted, giving them an alert expression.

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The trademark feature, however, is their thick double coat which can come in many colours, such as red, fawn, cream or black. The long protective outer coat stands off the body while the undercoat is soft and fluffy to keep them warm during colder climates. Their fur also forms around their neck, forming a ruff similar to that of a lion’s mane, which gives them an even more regal look!

The Chow Chow typically weighs between 20 to 32 kgs and are 45 to 50 cm tall at the withers – giving them an impressive stature.

On the hand, The Tibetan Mastiff’s size and appearance can be intimidating, but underneath the strong physical presence lies a docile, loyal companion. They have a robust body type with a broad head and deep chest, along with powerful shoulders and muscular legs designed for running over long distances.

The Tibetan Mastiff typically weighs between 80 to 160 pounds and stands up to 30 inches tall at the shoulder. Its coat can vary from short to long and usually comes in black, brown, grey or cream hues with red shading around its muzzle, eyes and legs. The long-haired variety has a double layer – an inner layer that’s soft and woolly for insulation against cold weather, plus an outer coat that’s coarse for protection from rain or snow.

Intelligence and Training: Who’s Top Dog When it Comes to Intelligence?

This beautiful breed is loyal to its owners and can be trained to be a perfect companion if done correctly. The Chow Chow is an independent thinker, but with positive reinforcement training in socialization, obedience, housebreaking, walking on a leash and other activities, it can become a great family member.

According to Psychologist Stanley Coren, Chow Chow may take up to 80 to 100 repetitions or more of each new command before they understand what you want them to do. It’s also important to note that your dog may not obey the first command 25 per cent of the time — so don’t get too frustrated and keep at it! With consistency and positive reinforcement, you can raise an obedient companion that will be loyal and devoted forever.

They have an innate ability to figure things out quickly, which makes them highly trainable when provided with proper guidance from their owners. It’s important to note that they don’t respond well to punishment-based methods and need consistent positive reinforcement instead.

On the other hand, It is believed that the Tibetan Mastiff’s incredible intellect was developed through centuries of selective breeding. But training a Tibetan Mastiff that exhibits such remarkable mental capabilities can sometimes be challenging.

Tibetan Mastiffs are fiercely loyal and devoted to their owners but also independent-minded when solving problems independently. They possess an innate intelligence that allows them to respond quickly to cues from their human handlers and can be trained easily with patience and consistency. Their superior sense of smell also helps them detect intruders or danger long before anyone else does.

These majestic dogs are highly intelligent and easily learn to manipulate their owners cunningly. To ensure proper training, owners must remain patient and consistent when teaching commands or tricks.

Exercise Needs: Which Breed of Dog is Full of Energy

Chow Chows were originally bred for hunting, so they are naturally active. They need at least an hour of physical activity every day – whether walking, running or playing – and mental stimulation with interactive games like fetch or hide-and-seek.

If your Chow Chow is feeling energetic, take them to the park for some socialization time too! Daily exercise will help keep your pup happy and healthy while preventing potential behavioural problems from arising due to boredom or lack of activity.

The Tibetan Mastiff is an ancient breed with a proud and majestic appearance that can be seen in the way they stand tall, head held high. With such striking features and an impressive personality, it’s no wonder this dog needs at least 1-2 hours of exercise daily.

This will help ensure their muscles are properly worked out and their joints remain mobile. 

This breed of dog requires much more activity than the average canine, as they were originally bred for herding and protecting livestock in the Tibetan mountains.

They have an abundance of energy that needs to be released through regular physical activities such as long walks, fetching games, and even swimming! Playtime with other dogs or humans also benefits these lovable creatures and helps keep them mentally stimulated. 

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Diet Requirements

The amount of food that a Chow Chow or Tibetan Mastiff will need will depend on several factors, including the individual dog’s size, age, activity level, and overall health. It is important to feed these breeds a high-quality, balanced diet that meets their nutritional needs.

Generally, adult Chow Chows should be fed about 1.5 to 2.5 cups of high-quality dry dog food per day, divided into two meals. Tibetan Mastiffs may require a bit more food, with adult dogs needing around 2.5 to 4 cups of dry food per day, divided into two meals.

It is important to remember that these are just general guidelines, and the amount of food your Chow Chow or Tibetan Mastiff will need may vary. It is always best to consult with a veterinarian or professional nutritionist to determine the specific nutritional needs of your individual dog.

Common Health Issues: Which breed is more prone to diseases?

Some common health issues that the Chow Chow may be prone to include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, glaucoma, entropion (inward rolling of the eyelid), and skin allergies. The breed may also be more prone to certain cancers, such as lymphoma and bladder cancer.

The Tibetan Mastiff may also be prone to hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and eye problems. Other health issues that may be seen in the breed include heart problems, skin allergies, and thyroid issues. The breed may also be at increased risk for certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma and bone cancer. The Chow Chow has a life expectancy of around 13-14 years.

It is important to remember that not all individuals of these breeds will necessarily develop these health issues, but it is important to be aware of the potential risks and discuss them with a veterinarian. Regular veterinary care and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can help to reduce the risk of these and other health problems. The Tibetan Mastiff has a life expectancy of around 13-14 years.

Puppy Price and Maintenance Cost

It is difficult to accurately estimate the price of a Tibetan Mastiff or Chow Chow puppy as it can vary significantly depending on several factors, including the location, breeder, and demand for the breed, etc. Tibetan Mastiffs and Chow Chows are both considered rare and exotic breeds, which may affect their price.

In general, Tibetan Mastiffs may be priced in the range of INR 1,40,000 to 1,50,000, and Chow Chow can cost between INR 40,100 to 98,100 for a puppy. It is important to carefully research and choose a reputable breeder when purchasing a Tibetan Mastiff or Chow Chow puppy.

In addition to the initial cost of purchasing a Tibetan Mastiff or Chow Chow puppy, it is important to consider the ongoing maintenance costs for the breed. These costs include food, veterinary care, grooming, training, and other supplies. It is a good idea to budget for these expenses and ensure that you are prepared to meet the financial needs of your new pet.

Grooming and Shedding

The Chow Chow requires regular brushing due to its thick double coat. The outer layer of fur helps keep the breed warm in colder climates, while the inner layer provides insulation from the heat in warmer weather conditions. 

Without proper brushing, their long coats will become matted and tangled. Furthermore, you should bathe them every month to help prevent skin infections and keep their coats clean and healthy. 

When it comes to shedding, this breed does shed a lot but not year-round as some other breeds do! During seasonal changes (typically spring and fall), Chows will blow out their undercoat, which can result in excess hair everywhere!

Tibetan Mastiffs require a lot of brushing to maintain their thick coat, which can come in red, black, or brown. Regular brushing helps remove dead hairs and keep their double coats clean.

 They shed seasonally and blow out their undercoat once or twice a year. During this time, they will need more frequent brushing. As these dogs are quite large, they also need regular bathing with an appropriate shampoo that won’t dry out their skin. You should also trim their nails regularly as they grow quickly.

Similarities between Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff

Chow chows and Tibetan mastiffs are large, ancient breeds of dogs with a strong build. Both breeds are known for their independent and somewhat aloof nature and can be reserved with strangers. Here are some additional similarities between these two breeds:

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Physical appearance: Both breeds have a thick, double coat in various colours, including black, red, blue, and cream. They both have a strong, muscular build, broad chests and thick necks.

Independent nature: Chow chows and Tibetan mastiffs are independent breeds known for their self-sufficient nature. They can be somewhat aloof and may not be as affectionate as some other breeds.

Protective nature: Both breeds are known for their protective nature and are often used as guard dogs. They are loyal to their families and will defend them if necessary.

Health concerns: Both breeds are prone to certain health issues, such as hip dysplasia and other joint problems. It is important to regularly monitor your dog’s health and consult with a veterinarian if you notice any unusual symptoms.

FAQs

What are the differences in size and appearance between the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff?

The Chow Chow is generally a smaller breed than the Tibetan Mastiff, with males weighing around 23-34 Kg and females weighing around 20-27 kg. On the other hand, the Tibetan Mastiff is a much larger breed, with males weighing around 45-73 kgs and females weighing around 34-54 kgs. 

What are the differences in temperament between the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff?

The Chow Chow is generally a more reserved and calm breed and may be more content to relax at home rather than engage in active play. This breed is known for being loyal and protective of its family, but can also be stubborn and difficult to train. 

On the other hand, the Tibetan Mastiff is a more energetic and boisterous breed that may require more exercise and playtime to stay happy and healthy. This breed is also known for being independent and protective but can be more prone to territorial aggression and may require more extensive training and socialization to manage these behaviours.

What are the differences in care requirements between the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff?

The Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff have thick, dense coats that require regular grooming. 

Which breed is better for families with children?

If you have young children, Chow Chow can not be a suitable option as they tend to be aggressive when provoked. However, with proper socialization, you can avoid this trait. 

On the other hand, Tibetan Mastiff has a calm demeanor and will be docile near young kids. 

Conclusion: Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff: Which is Better for you?

It is difficult to definitively say which breed is “better” for all potential owners. The right breed for an individual will depend on several factors, including their lifestyle, living situation, and personal preferences

Both the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff can make wonderful pets for the right families, but it is important to carefully consider the specific characteristics and needs of each breed to determine which one is the best fit for you.

The Chow Chow is generally a more reserved and calm breed and may be more content to relax at home rather than engage in active play. This breed is known for being loyal and protective of its family, but can also be stubborn and difficult to train. The Chow Chow may be a good fit for someone looking for a more laid-back companion and willing to put in the time and effort to train and socialize the breed.

On the other hand, the Tibetan Mastiff is a more energetic and boisterous breed that may require more exercise and playtime to stay happy and healthy. This breed is also known for being independent and protective but can be more prone to territorial aggression and may require more extensive training and socialization to manage these behaviors. 

The Tibetan Mastiff may be a good fit for someone looking for a more energetic and active companion and willing to put in the time and effort to train and socialize the breed.

Ultimately, it is important to carefully research and understand the specific characteristics and needs of both the Chow Chow and Tibetan Mastiff breeds before deciding which one best suits you and your family. It is also a good idea to speak with a veterinarian or professional breeder to get more insight into these breeds’ specific needs and characteristics.

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